Blog Archives

Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere: Accel World Enlightenment, Revisiting Madoka, and Jesus Figures in Kokoro Connect and Other Anime

David examines morality in Eureka Seven Ao, and mentions the use of Catholic liturgies as naming devices.  I’m a few episodes behind in the series and am actively avoiding spoilers, so I didn’t read the article, but I’m sure it’s fine reading as is typical of this wonderful site. [The Untold Story of Altair and Vega]

Guardian Enzo finds Buddhist allusions in episode 16 of Accel World and argues that the entire system could be viewed as a quest for enlightenment. [Lost in America]

In his commentary on episode 4 of Kokoro Connect, Draggle suggests that Taichi is a Christ figure, humbling and degrading himself to help Inaba be lifted up.  He also differentiates this comparison to the same involving Shou of Guilty Crown. [Draggle's Anime Blog]

Lori Henderson really enjoyed volumes 1-10 of the Clamp manga, RG Veda, which focuses on Vedic mythology. [Manga Xanadu]

Simon Wolfe breaks down male anime protagonists into three categories, including the “Jesus” lead. [Capsule Computers]

There’s a new site in the anime blogosphere involving Christianity.  Though not directly related to anime, the author seems intent on including some discussion of anime.  Here’s a summary of what the site is all about [Sacred † Vox]:

Welcome to the WordPress blog Sacred † Vox. I created this blog for posting inspiring Catholic and Christian images, poetry and other things. I want to use this blog to reach people and tell them that Jesus loves them.

Finally, I should note a renewed enthusiasm for Puella Magi Madoka Magica, one of the series I recommend that Christians watch.  Justin suggests that it has set a new standard and should be watched additionally for the messages it conveys. [Organization Anti-Social Geniuses]

Otakuandrain finds the application of the entropy plot point lacking, but otherwise gives the series very high marks. [Cajun Samurai]

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As part of the Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere series of posts, each week, Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included. 

Eureka Seven Ao and Generation Celebrity

I recently tweeted this:

The problem with Eureka Seven Ao is that there are too many fun characters. Oh, wait…that’s not a problem.

Obviously, I’m really digging the show.

Besides the wonderful action pieces and terrific animation, it’s the characters that have me absorbed.  And in particular, many of these interesting players are part of Generation Bleu.

Just as with Gekkostate in its predecessor, the pilots and leaders of Generation Bleu are rock stars in this alternate world.  They are do-gooders (as far as we know at this point) who also manage to be celebrities.

Generation Bleu

I update my blog all the time, too! Now, if I could only procure an IFO… (Art by えねりっく)

Isn’t it strange that in both Eureka Seven series, people fighting to do good (even in a rebellious manner) are society’s heroes?  I guess maybe it’s not so weird in the context of history, throughout much of which the scientists, religious leaders, philosophers, politicians, and other “good people” (if at least in that guise) were worshiped, sometimes literally, by the people.

Sometime in the 20th century, things shifted.  Suddenly, those who gave us entertainment became the objects of our admiration. Read the rest of this entry

Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere: Medaka Jesus Box, Liturgical IFOs, and Kami in the Legend of Zelda

Draggle compares two characters from Medaka Box to God the Father and Jesus Christ, pointing out ideas like perfection, brokenness, and one’s place before a perfect God. [Draggle's Anime Blog]

JoeAnimated examines the meanings of names in Eureka Seven Ao, including IFO names, which are all connected to Catholicism. [We Remember Love]

The latest attempt to present Christianity in a manga version is “The Bible: A Japanese Manga Rendition,” of which Ken gives a middling review. [Sequential Ink]

On her Manga Mondays column, Lady Saika invites us to check out the “Trinity Blood” manga, mentioning, among other things, the series’ religious aspects. [Lady Geek Girl and Friends]

One of our co-bloggers, Zeroe4, informs us about what he’s been doing in Tokyo for DTS (Discipleship Training School). [Zeroe4]

And though not directly related to anime or manga, I thought I’d end with Djinn’s analysis of the kami nature of Jabu-Jabu in Link’s “Ocarina of Time” adventures. [Zelda Dungeon]

Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere: Happy Science Anime, Mission: Otaku, and What’s in a Name?

Ammtoday has begun a blog similar to ours, examining Christianity through anime.  A post this past week compares a scene in the manga, From Far Away, to Jesus’ temptations in the wilderness, and encourages us to find power in weakness. [Anime and Manga Industries Today]

Ben Ettinger gives a very thorough review of the Happy Science-created film, Hermes, Wings of Love, which he calls “repugnant but beautiful.” [AniPages]

One of our bloggers, Zeroe4, compares himself to Bakuman‘s Mashiro, while mentioning his faith. [Zeroe4]

Zeroe4 also explained how anime figured into his decision to participate in DTS. [Zeroe4]

And for the trifecta, Zeroe4 rephrases a famous Pauline writing to reflect his mission to otaku. [Zeroe4]

Tsunderin revisits Saint Tale and includes some discussion of the manga’s religious setting. [Lady Geek Girl and Friends]

Myst analyzes the meanings of character names in Eureka Seven Ao and mentions that several are connected with religion. [Frozen Anime Blog]

Koji has new found confidence, similar to that which he experienced when he thought he’d “found god” a number of years ago. [Maschera]

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As part of the Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere series of posts, each week, Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.