Blog Archives

Something More: Catholicism in Noragami, Wolf Children of God, and Bye, Bye, Animekritik!

D.M. Dutcher reviews Wolf Children and finds a parallel to the idea of Christians being “in the world, but not of it.” [Speculative Faith]

Rob continues his Christian reviews, closing out series like Golden Time [1] and Nobunagun [2], while reviewing new shows like Captain Earth [3].

Medieval Otaku gives his thoughts on Witch Craft Works and Noragami, including some Catholic connections in each. [Medieval Otaku]

Additionally, Medieval Otaku, who has guested here and whom we frequently feature in this column, is celebrating the two-year anniversary of his blog.  Go congratulate him! [Medieval Otaku]

Unfortunately, on the other end of the spectrum, animekritik is closing his blog [Kritik der Animationskraft].

We’ve included links to a number of his excellent articles in the past – including some of the following favorites:

Top Blog Posts About Anime and Religion in 2012: #1-10

The end of the year means retrospection and of course, “best of” lists.  During my time in the aniblogosphere, I’ve been blessed to read hundreds and hundreds of wonderful posts, and though I don’t visit aniblog sites as much now as I did in the past, I still read articles related to anime and religion each week.  We present them on Fridays as part of the now-named Something More series.

Jesus and Buddha anime

Though I have a great collection of co-bloggers, I’ll leave staff-written post out the following list.  Instead, the list below is of articles written by other anibloggers involving anime/manga and religion/spirituality.  Numbers one through six are listed in chronological order (seven through twelve to follow tomorrow):

1. We are the pirates who don’t buy anything
1.5.2012
written by Tommy of Anime Bowl

In summary, I think that the small percentage of Christians who are anime fans and the large percentage of fansubbers who steal anime are two numbers that go hand-in-hand. Sure, there are Christians who watch fansubs, I know that I did for an arc of Bleach before giving up the crime for good. But I don’t think these statistics are any coincidence; instead, I think it’s something to ponder.

Read the entire post

Read also: A Culture of Hate

Read the rest of this entry

Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere: Tattoos of Psalms and Spike Spiegel, Pride of Fate/zero Mages, and a Holy Light on Gon

I discovered a new blog this week, and strangely not through the Aniblog Tourney.  Lady Geek Girl and Friends examines geek culture, but adds to that with discussion of religion, feminism, and other ideas.  In one post, for instance, Lady Saika dishes about the portrayal of Christianity in anime, realistic and otherwise. [Lady Geek Girl and Friends]

A documentary was just premiered which examines the depths of tattoo culture.  Interestingly enough, one of the doc’s featured individuals is a young woman who has tattoos inspired by both Cowboy Bebop and her Christian faith, including one of Spike Spiegel. [South Florida Sun-Sentinal]

In his post on episode 18 of Fate/zero, Draggle discusses Kiritsugu’s father and the sin of pride. [Draggle's Anime Blog]

Bitmap discusses the “mysterious bhavacakra” featured in the OP for Mysterious Girlfriend X. [The Untold Story of Altair and Vega]

Shimaru starts his analysis on episode 30 of Hunter x Hunter by saying how much Gon resembles Jesus in a scene from that episode. [UNMEI KAIHEN]

__

As part of the Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere series of posts, each week, Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included. 

Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere: Spitting Image of Stigmata, Zen Samurai, and the Prophet and Leviathan of Big O

A Day Without Me continues her thoughtful revisit of Big O II by analyzing episode four, beginning her post with talking prophets and explaining the symbolism of the Leviathan. [GAR GAR Stegosaurus]

Aorii is back in the mode of blogging (yay!), sorta (boo!), by discussing how the plot of a light novel she’s involved in translating, Campione!, involves an interesting take on mythology involving the ideas of heresy and blasphemy. [Major Arcana]

Bitmap compares the cuts appearing on characters’ hands in Mysterious Girlfriend X, episode 4, to stigmata, which he proposes has the same function as saliva does in this series (and yes, for those of you who haven’t watched the show yet, I wrote saliva). [The Untold Story of Altair and Vega]

Rich Johnston discusses film and written adaptations of Miyamoto Musashi’s life, including the manga VAGABOND, which like many of the others, emphasizes the samurai’s practice of Zen Buddhism. [Bleeding Cool]

__

As part of the Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere series of posts, each week, Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included. 

Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere: In the Garden of Yuri, the Significance of Jesus Cosplay, and Hindu Anime Cola

Ray wonders what would have happened to him if anime had never come into the picture, and ponders about the connection between his Christian faith and that medium. [Anime Diet]

Also on Anime Diet, Monsieur LaMoe laments the lack of nun characters this season, as he graphically explains why is moe for Christian girls, while more seriously explaining a bit about missional schools in Japan [Anime Diet]:

Guilty pleasure is the most sinful! Virgin Mary now becomes a symbol of yuri! If I’m a girl, I would be definitely worshiping our Lady!

Charles Dunbar’s recent post is a fascinating piece comparing religious gatherings and conventions and includes a very interesting story about an Easter service and an individual cosplaying as Jesus. [Study of Anime]

Dliessmgg shares matter of personal faith while emphasizing how anime can be a religious experience. [Inflating the Tokidoki Balloon]

Suburbanbanshee provides some context for the Catholic imagery in episode 2 of Sakamichi no Apollon. [Over the Rhine and Into the Tiber]

Draggle also gives his feedback on episode 2 of Sakamichi no Apollon, including some thoughts on the introduction of Christianity into the plot. [Draggle's Anime Blog]

Bitmap examines some of the mysteries of Mysterious Girlfriend X, episode 2, including a cola can that references Hindu astrology. [The Untold Story of Altair and Vega]

__

As part of the Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere series of posts, each week, Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included. 

Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere: Jazzy Christians, the Religious Context in Tsuritama, and Holy Spit!

Anime Kritik takes an unusual approach to the spit-filled first episode of Mysterious Girlfriend X, taking about, among other things, Biblical ideas regarding spit (and other bodily fluids) and the freedom of the New Covenant. [Kritik der Animationskraft]

Mira does an amazing job of unraveling the religious symbolism, including Hindu, Buddhist, and Shinto elements,  connected to the opening myth (and therefore the locale) presented in episode one of Tsuritama. [Hachimitsu]

This week revealed that Christianity may play a significant role in the new anime, Sakamichi no Apollon.  A number of bloggers mentioned this, with Tsuki giving more thoughts than most. [Emory Anime Club]

__

As part of the Spirituality in the Anime Blogosphere series of posts, each week, Beneath the Tangles links to writings about anime and manga that involve religion and spirituality.  If you’ve written such a piece or know of one, please email TWWK if you’d like it included.